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10 Tips to Improve Your Time Management Skills 2018-06-27T12:26:05+00:00

TIPS TO IMPROVE TIME MANAGEMENT

The following are the top 10 areas where people, by applying a little self-discipline, can improve their time management skills. See if any of these apply to you:

Avoid procrastination

People put things off for one or more of the following reasons: fear of failure; lack of enjoyment in carrying out the task; seeking perfection; getting distracted, or failing to set clear priorities.

If you find that you’re procrastinating, here’s a simple tip: Do just one thing towards completing the task – the first line of a report, the first box emptied, the first line of a letter you need to write. Ninety-nine times out of 100 you’ll go on to complete the task, simply because you started it. Highly successful people often do the unpleasant tasks first. Having an unpleasant task hanging over your head drains your energy. So go ahead: JUST DO IT.

Don’t try to be perfect

Winston Churchill once said, “The maxim that nothing avails but perfection spells paralysis.” Aim for excellence – or as good as is possible – and go ahead and do it.

Take time to plan

By setting out a plan that is both realistic and achievable, you give yourself a target for self-discipline. With a plan, you know what your should be concentrating on and can identify potential distractions.

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“Caregivers who are equipped with knowledge can favorably affect the outcome of the health condition, and deal with it in a more effective manner.

Tools such as the Dr. Guide books educate people in the proper preventative and treatment techniques, supplying them with a degree of confidence and allaying fears of the unknown.”

Dr. Philip Lieberman

“I look upon the “Herb Interaction” book as a “quickie” for my pharmacy team, no need to get bogged down on the computer.”

David (Ontario, Canada), Pharmacist

“We had the highest BRC (business Reply Card) return rate of all time – it built up great customer goodwill and easier repeat calls.”

Joe (Pennsylvania), Sales Manager

The Dr’ Guide books were a great door opener and relationship builder with the allergy medical team. Our reps loved them.

Alex (New Jersey), Product Manager

Aim to be proactive rather than reactive

Some jobs are by nature reactive, and you have to live with that. And some people love a crisis and thrive on urgent deadlines. Your personality plays a big part in whether you prefer to be a “firefighter” type or an “administrator” type. Learn how proactive activities can help your ability to manage your time.

Avoid unnecessary tasks

Refer to your Key Areas and Key Activities, and decide what are the things you do that don’t really need doing. Ask yourself the following question: “What would happen if I didn’t do this? Do I really need to do it? If so, do I really need to do it now?”

Group similar tasks

If you can manage to do it, it’s often more efficient to carry out a number of similar tasks at once. Making six telephone calls within a half-hour period takes less time out of your day than making those calls at intervals spread out throughout your workday.

Be tidy

Knowing where everything is can be a real time saver. How often during a day do you waste time searching for something?

Practice active listening

You stand a better chance of getting your job done right – or delegating a project to someone else – if you listen carefully and check for mutual understanding.

Be assertive

Sticking up for yourself when it comes to completing important tasks can be the single most important aspect of improving your time management skills. If you know what’s important – not necessarily urgent – and are not afraid to say it, you’ll be much more productive in the long run. Assertiveness takes time to enhance if it doesn’t come naturally, but it’s a vital skill that can be improved upon.

Set objectives

A common trait of highly successful people is that they continually set goals and objectives. Do this for yourself. Set long-term goals (“I’m going to improve my golf handicap”; “In 5 years I want to be at such-and-such a level in my career”) and short term goals (“By the end of this week I’ll have written this report”; “Tonight I’ll sit down with the kids and make up a household chore roster.”) Remember: If you don’t know where you’re going, any road will take you there!

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I look upon the “Herb Interaction” book as a “quickie” for my pharmacy team, no need to get bogged down on the computer.
David (pharmacist) Ontario
The book on “foot ulcers” spoke to me, I now understand the importance of foot care.
Janice. (Caregiver) Akron Ohio
We forget sometimes the power of the patient for healing through compliance and self care habits. We should provide understandable information.
Philip (Physician) Pittsburgh, Pensylvania
The Dr’ Guide books were a great door opener and relationship builder with the allergy medical team. Our reps loved them.
Alex (Product Manager), New Jersey.
We had the highest BRC (business Reply Card) return rate of all time – it built up great customer goodwill and easier repeat calls.
Joe (Sales Manager) Pennsylvania
The distribution of the Dr. Guide books was the most cost effective, most quickly integrated and best ROI program I have had in years – no committee development meetings, no sky high “creative” costs and so appropriate for our product / treatment messages.
Robert, (Director of marketing) Montreal.